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That was strange I was typing a reply to you and it dissapeared. Icons are playing== so again - THANKS.
I get a few there but look for collections from families where the kids have grown. It's also much cheaper than individual copies. I just joined AS and immediately got a Walter Brennan LP of Gunfight At The OK Corral. Under $10 so my snipes are paid for 2004, Its just a hobby. When I get dupes I try to trade even up.
I posted here because I read a few Aussie Posts and some of my best treasures have come from there and Canada. ...and your rocker is Priceless
Hi. If you are very interested in the old westerns, you might like to get your hands on a VHS.
On Location, Lone Pine, CA.
That is where they filmed most of them. It shows the various locations and is loaded with great info on the old films. I can not put my hands on my copy at the moment, but it is a lot of fun to watch if you like the old westerns. Cool

"Shop" and My Snipes
MANY THANKS -Lone Pine is great - have yet to find the Movie. I grew up on B/W TV Westerns which included Gene Autry, Buffalo Bill Jr, Cisco Kid ,Judge Roy Bean Annie Oakley These were made on a set at "Pioneertown"
(If you go to their site its all one word),
Autry and his friends each put up $500 and bought the land. Every new movie they built another false front store and its now a California Tourist Attraction. Most are lost
forever except prints that went overseas and got
re-released on VHS. These average $40. The big later Movie Blockbusters you can get for $3. I started with Movie Posters but the market is now flooded with aged fakes lithographed in China.. The same with Cast Iron Banks Tiffany Lamps and even bedding. But we all know that.
This internet is fantastic,today I learned that Polar Bears aren't White. Mory



. they
Found this with a quick google search.

quote:
Despite what our eyes tell us, a polar bear's fur is not white. Each hair shaft is pigment-free and transparent with a hollow core.

Polar bears look white because the hollow core scatters and reflects visible light, much like ice and snow does.

When photographed with film sensitive to ultraviolet light, polar bears appear black.


Despite what our eyes tell us, a polar bear's fur is not white. Each hair shaft is pigment-free and transparent with a hollow core.

Polar bears look white because the hollow core scatters and reflects visible light, much like ice and snow does.

When photographed with film sensitive to ultraviolet light, polar bears appear black.

Early speculation over this discrepancy produced a theory, now widely repeated as fact, that polar bear hair acts like a fiber optic guide to conduct ultraviolet light to the skin.
In 1998, Daniel W. Koon, a physicist at St. Lawrence University in Canton, New York, decided to actually test whether or not polar bear hair could efficiently conduct ultraviolet light.
Koon and a graduate assistant, Reid Hutchins, obtained polar bear hair from the Seneca Park Zoo in Rochester. Their experiments showed that a one-fifth inch strand of polar bear hair was able to conduct less than a thousandth of a percent of the applied ultraviolet light. With such a high loss rate, meaningful amounts of ultraviolet light cannot be reaching a polar bear's skin.
Instead, Koon believes the ultraviolet light is absorbed by the keratin making up the hair.

In 1979, three polar bears at the San Diego Zoo turned green. Scientists discovered that colonies of algae were growing in the bears' hollow hair shafts.

Although the algae in no way harmed the animals, zoo veterinarian Phillip Robinson restored the bears' white fur by killing the algae with a salt solution.

The fur on a polar bear cub is whiter than that of adult bears. In older bears, fur colors range from white to almost yellow.

Hybrid cubs born to captive polar bears and their close relative, the brown bear, are white at birth but later turn blue-brown or yellow-white.

A polar bear is so well-insulated that it experiences almost no heat loss. In addition to its insulating fur, the bear's blubber layer can measure 4.5 inches thick.

So effective is the polar bear's insulation that adult males quickly overheat when they run.

Because polar bears give off no detectable heat, they do not show up in infrared photographs. (Infrared film measures heat.) When a scientist attempted to photograph a bear with such film, he produced a print with a single spot--the puff of air caused by the animal's breath.

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